Hail storm hits North Carolina ahead of developing into nor’easter bringing SNOW to the Northeast

Large hail stones came down on Monday in Cary, North Carolina, as severe thunderstorms hit the area ahead of a weather system moving up the East Coast that could bring snow to New England.

The storm originated in the South, causing significant flooding in Mississippi and Louisiana, bringing rain and winds that downed trees in the Tarheel State as it moved up the coast, ABC News reported.

That and another storm system coming from the Midwest will combine to form a nor’easter over Monday and Tuesday, resulting in winter weather chills, several inches of rain throughout Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York and Massachusetts and even snow in some areas of New England. 

Colder air will will cut across the Northeast on Monday night through Tuesday thanks to a dip in the jet stream.

The system which wreaked havoc throughout the South will also slowly move up the East Coast, gaining strength and escalating to a low-level nor’easter on Monday. 

A nor’easter can occur at any time of year but generally are most common and more severe between the months of September and April, according to weather.gov.

The combined weather systems are expected to bring snow to high-terrain areas of New England by Tuesday morning.

Snowfall accumulation could reach up to five inches in these areas and throughout the mountains of the Northeast.  

Rain and gusty winds are expected to strike elsewhere throughout the Northeast.

Another two inches of rain accumulation is possible over the next 36 hours in parts of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York and Massachusetts.

The low temperature overnight on Monday in New York is forecast to be 39 degrees Fahrenheit (3.9 degrees Celsius), according to Accuweather.

The high on Monday was 49 degrees Fahrenheit (9.4 degrees Celsius).

The ‘normal’ high for May 13 is typically 71 degrees Fahrenheit (21.7 degrees Celsius).

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